What others have to say

You’re not alone. Please feel free to contact us confidentially.

Others’ comments and stories to follow as permission is given us to share in an anonymous fashion.

 

 

 

Comments

“Exactly the same thing happened to me, (almost verbatim) 40 years ago. Survived and was the better for it. Very interesting – how times don’t change. Best wishes to you.” – J.C.


(Not too much can be shared publicly from this email. Heavily redacted.) “I was a senior resident at SLU… (someone) was extremely destructive, toxic, and an all around nasty….” On an email reply in our conversations: “… doesn’t instruct… berates and demeans residents…. like a scowling dragon or a pit viper ready at all times to bite.” – anonymized


“… As a former SLU employee, I am in no way surprised the the Department of Surgery and SLU administration treated Dr. Rice this way.” – anonymized


“I worked with Mandy Rice for years in the PICU in Texas. Her drive and determination to further her career was inspiring. What is happening to her now is deplorable given her commitment to her surgical rotation. What precedent are you setting here? Nurses can’t aspire to be doctors or surgeons?? She specifically is the epitome of what you would want in this type of candidate. I hope your department takes this seriously and does not make her repeat a year for unfounded accusations.” – Kim D.


“I believe your past experience as a nurse gives you a leg up on your peers. When I found out you were a nurse before, it solidified why you were my favorite trauma resident.” – anonymized.


“… Some people could use a lesson in treating people with respect. I loved working with you in the OR. Hope this is resolved quickly so you can move forward. You are an awesome human being, former nurse, future surgeon.” – anonymized


“Maybe more doctors and residents should act like nurses if that means spending more time with their patients, seeing them as people and not as a diagnosis, comfort(ing) them and know(ing) that not everyone has a good life, education, money, a job, a home, food or family. Acting like a nurse is not to (your) detriment – it makes (you) a stronger and more compassionate doctor, which are characteristics lacking in A LOT of doctors in all levels of their profession.” – anonymized


“I have unfortunately had my share of surgeons and wished most of them had worked on their compassion a little more. I think your nursing background brings much needed approachability for the patients.” – S.R.


“Seriously one of the best! I love working with you and I always know I’m going to have a good day when you’re the trauma chief!!” – anonymized


“Always a pleasure to work with you. Always caring & professional to everyone no matter the situation. Stay strong and keep up the great work!” – anonymized


 “I have never forgotten your kindness and patience on my third year surgery rotation. You were functioning at a higher level than many residents, even as a fourth year student. Your passion for your job and compassion for your patients inspired me and was one of the reasons I wanted to do something surgical.” – anonymized


 “You are an amazing physician. I always loved working with you and feeling like part of the team. Your kindness, compassion, knowledge, and drive were obviously shining out of you whenever you walked onto the unit. HUGE respect for not rolling over and letting yourself be pushed around.” – anonymized


 

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SLUCP: Driving education, awareness, and positive change towards systemic improvement for St. Louis University med school residents, faculty, and staff.

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